sustainable site modifications

Hendricks Regional Health – Danville, IN Campus

Purdue Sustainable Stormwater Improvements at Ross Ade Stadium Parking Lot
West Lafayette, Indiana
Nov 2009 – Nov 2011

Involvement:
Elements was the engineer of record and a subcontractor to Meliora Environmental Design (from Pennsylvania).  Andropogon, a landscape architecture company (PA), was also on the team.  Elements assisted with design, permitting, QA/QC and CA on the 7-acre project site.

Detail:
The project included the creation of a 740’ bio-swale and 13 bio-filtration tree islands within the existing parking lot.  The parking lot is located at the upstream end of the watershed for the campus and contributes to the stormwater issues immediately downstream.  The work on this project and the infiltration bed under the practice football fields adjacent to it (for which Elements was also involved) helps to reduce the load on the system by slowing the flow and using infiltration.  The bio-swale runs the length of the parking lot and the system connects to the infiltration bed under the practice football fields.  The new bio-swale and tree islands provide an appealing landscape, which is also functional for stormwater quality and quantity.

Brook Park Elementary Teaching Rain Garden
Indianapolis, Indiana
2011

Involvement:
Elements was the engineer of record and teamed with Remenschneider Associates on the project.  The existing dry detention basin was transformed into an educational facility for the students to learn about water quality and other related subjects that are connected to their curriculum as an environmental magnet school.  A deck was constructed in the basin as a teaching platform and native plants were used in the various climates created by the shallow excavation.  The students participate in the planting of the basin at a ‘planting day’ event.

Irvington Community School Teaching Rain Garden
Indianapolis, Indiana
2011

Involvement:
Elements teamed with Remenschneider Associates and Mundell Associates on the project.  The existing lawn side yard and swale area was transformed into aneducational facility for the students to learn about water quality andother related subjects connected to their curriculum.  The existing swale was modified and three shallow rain gardens created to capture roof flow.  Native plants were used in each basin.  On planting day a box turtle was discovered on the site.  It became the project mascot and was affectionately named “Irv”.  The project is located adjacent to the Pennsy Trail and has an educational sign posted on the trail that illustrates the function of the rain garden.

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